Bot Playtesting Toolkit v. 1.1 released

This blogpost was moved here from https://creatingboardgames.wordpress.com/2022/01/20/bot-playtesting-toolkit-v-1-1-released/

It seems only yesterday that version 1.0 of the Bot Playtesting Toolkit was released, and today a bunch of new functionality was added.

The most work has been done on improving the Track class, used for describing not only linear tracks but also grids of connected spaces. A cool function in version 1.0 is, in my humble opinion, that the toolkit automatically can find the shortest path to a space on the board and also the distance to it. In version 1.1 there are several additions that are pretty cool, too:

Another improvement is that pawns, used on tracks, are now a class of their own. This makes easier to move the pawns about, and also to add arbitrary properties to the pawns.

I also moved the documentation to the version controlled files in the repository. This means that whichever version of the Bot Playtesting Toolkit is downloaded, the relevant documentation will be brought with it. This would be difficult to do in the project wiki (which either will be shut down or get content of a different nature).

I am happy that I have tests included in the Bot Playtesting Toolkit. They have helped me find bugs, and reassured me that things work as expected when I’ve rewritten parts of the code. Automated tests rocks.

Want to try it out? Either make a copy of the 1.1 template right away or, perhaps wiser, read about how to get started.

Recommended1 recommendationPublished in Design Theory
Design Theory
Carla Kopp

In Depth Design: Venice

If you haven’t played Venice by Braincrack Games, you can check out the BGG page or this video by Gaming Rules! Venice is a really neat blend of worker placement and pick up and deliver. In Venice, you’ll travel around Venice in gondolas, leaving assistants at most of the locations you stop on. Each time

Read More »
Design Theory
Joe Slack

10 ways to come up with brilliant game ideas

Everyone loves a good top 10 list, so I thought I would put together a list of my 10 favorite ways to come up with new board game ideas. I’ve mentioned some of these methods in The Board Game Designer’s Guide but I’m also going to add some new ideas here. 1. Play lots of

Read More »

Responses

    1. Thanks! The toolkit has taken a few more steps since the last blogpost. I hope to write about it pretty soon.

      If you try it out and have questions, don’t hesitate to ask. GLHF!